Climbing/trailing plant

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Sue
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Climbing/trailing plant

Post by Sue » Fri 04 Mar 2011 11:24

I have a fence along which I want to train some sort of climbing plant. Preferably something that will hold its leaves in winter so it doesnt just look like bare branches. I had thought about a passion flowers but has anyone got any suggestions.
Dylan

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Re: Climbing/trailing plant

Post by russell » Fri 04 Mar 2011 11:39

Sue wrote:I have a fence along which I want to train some sort of climbing plant. Preferably something that will hold its leaves in winter so it doesnt just look like bare branches. I had thought about a passion flowers but has anyone got any suggestions.
I planted a Passiflora a few years back and now regret it. They are just too vigorous here. It was very difficult to control and self seeded everywhere. I killed it off a couple of years ago but still seedlings keep coming back. I noticed one in my neighbour's garden this week.

Sorry, I haven't found a good replacement yet :(

Russell

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Climbing plant

Post by Sue » Fri 04 Mar 2011 11:48

Thanks for that Russell. Really helpful and will no long consider one. Hopefully someone can suggest something else which would look good but not take over!
Dylan

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Post by rhys » Sat 05 Mar 2011 14:59

Could a lime or lemon tree be espaliered along the fence ?

True, does not answer the winter leaves point but you can't have everything - and it would be pleasantly decadent for 8 or 9 months of the year, once established.

Grape vine ? Much quicker to cover the area, albeit not as 'exotic' as lime etc .

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Post by Sue » Sat 05 Mar 2011 15:04

Thanks Rhys. I think I may have decided on Jasmine. Our neighbours have one and it seems to survive the winter and not too vigourous with a bit of pruning.
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Post by russell » Sat 05 Mar 2011 16:41

Just had a thought ; Jasmine - we have one growing on a fence and although it spreads it is not too vigorous. Lovely scent when it flowers and green leaves all year. Can be a bit sensitive to frost but ours has survived three or four years so far.

Russell.

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Post by Robert Ferrieux » Sat 05 Mar 2011 21:25

Helen

`Honeysuckle? Very quick growing, and wonderful scent.

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Post by edann42 » Sun 06 Mar 2011 05:28

Honeysuckle is supurb for fences!

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Post by Sue » Sun 06 Mar 2011 08:06

Isnt honeysuckle a bit invasive. We had this in England and it took over.
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Post by edann42 » Sun 06 Mar 2011 10:21

I cut it back as and when, has suited us! Ours is grown in a large pot, however!!

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Post by russell » Sun 06 Mar 2011 11:15

edann42 wrote:I cut it back as and when, has suited us! Ours is grown in a large pot, however!!
Yes, planting it in a pot will restrict it's growth. There are dozens of varieties of honeysuckle. We have a shrub variety which is much less invasive. You could get one of these and train it along the fence. It will need suport though and of course it doesn't stay green in winter.

Russell.

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