Weather Forecast

What's the weather like where you are?

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
john
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 1075
Joined: Tue 20 Dec 2005 20:14
Contact:

Weather Forecast

Post by john » Thu 27 Aug 2009 08:51

john wrote:As a matter of interest ,what was the official humidity figure yesterday?
Hi john :)

This is at 4pm yesterday, but you can see other times as well.

http://www.meteociel.fr/temps-reel/obs_ ... envoyer=OK

Cheers Sav :)

So yes,we weren't imagining it....into the 90's % . The only places I've ever experienced those sort of figures(combined with heat) before have been in places like the Thai coast, Borneo and Singapore.

Incidentally,most days you put "moderate to high" in your forecasts re humidity.

a, what figure does it have to pass to become "high" ?

b, I'd say humidity has been unusually high here this summer generally. Is that the case?

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Thu 27 Aug 2009 12:19

john wrote: Incidentally,most days you put "moderate to high" in your forecasts re humidity.

a, what figure does it have to pass to become "high" ?

b, I'd say humidity has been unusually high here this summer generally. Is that the case?
Hi john :)

I just give a rough guide to humidity levels
If you go to the site, it does give you figures based on the day.
You can use the other link, to look back at previous years.

Cheers Sav :)
Last edited by Sav on Tue 02 Oct 2012 18:26, edited 1 time in total.

thumbelina
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 811
Joined: Wed 22 Oct 2008 22:00
Contact:

Post by thumbelina » Thu 08 Oct 2009 12:28

Valeurs remarquables de octobre en Pyrénées-Orientales

TMax : 34.2°C (Perpignan le 03/10/1985)

TMin : 1.2°C (Perpignan le 27/10/1973)

Précip : 165.2 mm (Perpignan le 10/10/1965)

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Sun 22 Nov 2009 14:54

john wrote:Really weird weather here in Ceret yesterday eve Sav.

It blew an absolute hooly from late afternoon onwards,got progressively WARMER,and topped out at 24° (yes you did read that right) at 9pm. We went out for a bite to eat,and I was in shirtsleeves. It got quite stifling in the restaurant.

Most strange.
Hi john :)

A very interesting localised event by the sounds of things.
Perpignan was above 14°C for most of the evening, but it was a little breezy.
http://www.meteociel.fr/temps-reel/obs_ ... envoyer=OK

What you experienced was probably a Fohn

Quote: The föhn is a warm, dry, gusty wind which occurs over the lower slopes on the lee side of a mountain barrier. It results from the forcing of stable air over a mountain barrier and its onset is generally sudden. For example, the temperature may rise more than 10°C in five minutes and the wind strength increase from almost calm to gale force just as quickly. Föhn winds occur quite often in the Alps (where the name föhn originated) and in the Rockies (where the name chinook is used). They also occur in the Moray Firth and over eastern parts of New Zealand’s South Island. In addition, they occur over eastern Sri Lanka during the south-west monsoon.
http://www.rmets.org/activities/schools ... .php#foehn

A last glance at summer perhaps :lol:
It should start cooling down later in the week ;)

Cheers Sav :)

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Sun 22 Nov 2009 15:38

john wrote:Thanks for that,my friend. I had heard of the fohn before. Isn't it they that are often responsible for avalaches?

Didn't realise we got them here as well.

A good deal cooler and calmer here today,and the sun is shining brightly now after a dull start.
Here is a better description john & actually uses the Pyrenees ;)
http://www.summitpost.org/article/46643 ... ffect.html

Yes they can cause Avalanches
http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/ ... hn.sp.html

Looks set fair in Ceret today & you should see the sun soon ;)
Its been pouring down here again & windy :roll:

Cheers Sav :)

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Fri 01 Jan 2010 18:11

blackduff wrote: Thanks for the good info about the weather in the PO. It's always nice to have someone checking if the sun will open it's face.
john wrote:Quite so,BD. I find I rely more on Sav's forecasts than those from MeteoFrance,Consult and the BBC these days.
Many thanks & i hope the new year is great for you :D
Good to hear that my input here in Angleterre, is helpfull to you all in the PO ;)

Cheers Sav :)

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Wed 06 Jan 2010 14:39

To answer some questions regarding the forecasting model & temps :D
The GFS model runs 4 times a day, as some of you are probably aware.
I use the 18Z, as its the nearest i can get to giving you a next day forecast, unless i get up during the night for the 00Z :roll:
The GFS is one amongst other models & via Meteociel, it enables me to give you all a more detailed forecast for your locale.
The other site for models
http://www.wetterzentrale.de/
This i have used when the models via Meteociel have not updated, but it does involve looking at the greater weather picture & you would just get a regional forecast based on what i see ;)
So thanks to Meteociel, we are able to gain a better view of local weather :D
However models can vary & what one says, another one may disagree with, but this is what the weather people base their forecasts on.
Data collected goes into a computer & then out rolls the information.
I have translated this from Meteociel

Quote: The forecasts at 3 weather days presented here for Céret (the Eastern Pyrenees) are experimental and given starting from the raw data of GFS, an American digital model, these forecasts must be taken as an indication. Estimates of temperatures and wind of the d' cities; altitude can be a little erroneous. Adjustments are in hand.

Bear this in mind & of course your location, which can affect temps.
Media forecasts are very generalised & it depends when they have been recorded & how updated their information is at that time.
So the best way to view any weather approaching, is to use the models.
This might help ;)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:A ... ate_Models

The windchill your going to have to add to the temp

I'm not a weather forecaster, but enjoy watching the weather & if i can help & assist people with my hobby, then that makes me happy :D

Cheers Sav :)
Last edited by Sav on Tue 02 Oct 2012 18:25, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Tue 12 Jan 2010 18:02

john wrote:Yes,I noticed that Meteo ciel are still showing yesterday's weather/predictions.

It certainly is very windy,but I'm now sure their temp figures must take wind chill into account. There is no way that it is -5° just now,as all the snow around my house is melting fast,and that would clearly not happen if the temp was as cold as that!
Hi john

It could be that they are busy uploading information to the site, during this busy period of weather.
Also no doubt lots of traffic to the site recently, so you may have had problems loading pages.

As far as wind chill is concerned, the temp given would be the actual expected at that time.
But if its windy, they could then work out the wind chill factor.
If they had placed a temp alongside it, then that's the temp you will actually feel when your out.
They would still have to give you an actual forecast temp though .

Meteociel do say the forecasts are experimental
I would be interested to find out how they come about their temps, as they seem to be the only people that offer a more detailed area forecast.
The other site
http://www.wetterzentrale.de/
Will just give you a countrywide view & you would have to go into each section to determine a regional forecast.
Which is why i prefer Meteociel, as it makes my life easier.
I assume they have a computer programmed for this.
Hope that helps a little

Cheers Sav

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Re: Weather

Post by Sav » Fri 19 Feb 2010 15:21

BT wrote:Hi Sav,

Thinking of heading to St Cyp for a few days in late April. What temps can I expect ?

Regards

BT
Hi BT :)

April can be a changeable month, probably where the term April showers comes in :wink:
Here's a link to St Cyprien temps etc
http://www.zoover.co.uk/france/languedo ... en/weather

Also
If you go by the April stats for Perpignan
They had a high of 25.9°C on the 25th April 2008 & it got down to 5°C on the 19th.
http://www.meteociel.fr/climatologie/vi ... annee=2008

It reached 27.1°C on April 23rd 2009 & got down to a low of 6.3°C on the 4th.
http://www.meteociel.fr/climatologie/vi ... annee=2009

Perpignan's April Averages
2008
Max - 19.1°C
Min - 9.4°C

2009
Max - 17.6°C
Min - 9.5°C

I think you will hopefully get some t shirt weather, but keep a brolly handy :lol:

Cheers Sav :)

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Fri 19 Feb 2010 15:27

john wrote:It'll be interesting to see what sav says on this,BT,but in my experience April is the least predictable month here in PO. We've had some superb weather in April,but also (eg last year) some shockers.
Hi john :)

April 7th, 11th & 12th :roll:
But it did get a little better ;)
http://www.meteociel.fr/climatologie/vi ... annee=2009

Cheers Sav :)

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Mon 08 Mar 2010 00:54

Bonjour tous :)

Stay at home :roll:
Time for the 18Z ;)

Mont Louis

Cloudy with moderate/heavy snow
Becoming breezy, winds from a N direction - 20/25km/h.
The max afternoon temp is expected to reach -6°C
Humidity high

Arles sur Tech

Cloudy with moderate/heavy snow
Becoming breezy, winds from a N direction - 20/30km/h.
The max afternoon temp is expected to reach -1°C
Humidity high

Ceret

Cloudy with moderate/heavy snow
Becoming breezy, winds from a N direction - 20/30km/h.
The max afternoon temp is expected to reach 0°C
Humidity high

Le Boulou

Cloudy with moderate snow early on, turning to heavy rain.
Becoming breezy, winds from a N direction - 20/30km/h.
The max afternoon temp is expected to reach 1°C
Humidity high

Prades

Cloudy with moderate/heavy snow
Becoming breezy, winds from a N direction - 20/25km/h.
The max afternoon temp is expected to reach -3°C
Humidity high

Maury

Cloudy with moderate/heavy snow
Some breeze expected later, winds from a N direction - 20km/h.
The max afternoon temp is expected to reach 0°C
Humidity high

Barcares

Cloudy with moderate/heavy rain
Breezy winds from a N direction - 20/30km/h.
The max afternoon temp is expected to reach 4°C
Humidity high

Perpignan

Cloudy with moderate/heavy rain
Becoming breezy, winds from a N direction - 20/25km/h.
The max afternoon temp is expected to reach 2°C
Humidity high

Argeles sur Mer

Cloudy with moderate/heavy rain
Breezy/windy from a N direction - 20/35km/h.
The max afternoon temp is expected to reach 4°C
Humidity high
http://www.meteociel.fr/index.php

Summary

Time to open the scrabble/monopoly :lol:
Well if you have been following the forecast, then you will have sufficient PG Tips & bread to keep you going ;)
Snow/rain will sweep across the region & this could be heavy at times :roll:
Once again snow is difficult to predict, as you can see with the Ceret/Boulou forecast, it just depends on the temps etc at the time.
So lets add some breeze/wind to the mix & combined with low temps, its a pretty grim winters day.
Temps will range from a very cold -6°C to a max of 4°C
Stay safe everyone.
There's allways summer to look forward to ;)

Outlook

Any snow/rain should clear, but it will stay cool & breezy.

Cheers Sav :)

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Mon 08 Mar 2010 18:12

Bonsoir tous :)

Gather round the fire :lol:

Overnight Lows

Mont Louis: -8°C
Arles sur Tech: -4°C
Ceret: -3°C
Le Boulou: -2°C
Prades: -6°C
Maury: -4°C
Barcares: -1°C
Perpignan: -2°C
Argeles sur Mer: -0°C

Snow clearing :wink:

GFS 12Z

Cheers Sav :)

thumbelina
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 811
Joined: Wed 22 Oct 2008 22:00
Contact:

Post by thumbelina » Tue 15 Jun 2010 18:31

Thirty years or so ago Canigou had some snow all year round. Snow is not unheard of during the summer months. Around 20 years ago during July, 25 cms of snow fell overnight on the Capcir.

20 July 2003, snow fell on Batere.

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Tue 24 Aug 2010 18:37

thumbelina wrote:In fact, today, (so I am reliably informed) we have the FW the Canigonenc - something which doesn't happen that often!
I could only find reference to wind turbines etc :roll:
Sounds like a local phenomena
http://canigonenc.free.fr/

Cheers Sav :)

thumbelina
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 811
Joined: Wed 22 Oct 2008 22:00
Contact:

Post by thumbelina » Tue 24 Aug 2010 18:40

Among the climatic elements, the regions’ range of winds is part of its character. On the Rosselló plain the wind is present 300 days a year and is primarily the strong and dry Tramuntana ( 41% of all winds – a minimum speed of 54km/h) followed by the Marinada, the Migjorn and the Canigonenc. North Catalonia is also swept by a multitude of other winds, such as the Llebeig, the Xaloc, the Gregal, the Vent d’Espanya, the Vent de Mar, the Narbonès, the Ponent, the Vent de Dalt and the Carcanet.

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Mon 30 Aug 2010 14:20

Marguerite & Steve wrote:Can someone explain Humidity to me, and what is mean in %'s .
This may help

Quote: Humans are very sensitive to humidity, as the skin relies on the air to get rid of moisture. The process of sweating is your body's attempt to keep cool and maintain its current temperature. If the air is at 100-percent relative humidity, sweat will not evaporate into the air. As a result, we feel much hotter than the actual temperature when the relative humidity is high. If the relative humidity is low, we can feel much cooler than the actual temperature because our sweat evaporates easily, cooling ­us off. For example, if the air temperature is 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 degrees Celsius) and the relative humidity is zero percent, the air temperature feels like 69 degrees Fahrenheit (21 C) to our bodies. If the air temperature is 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 C) and the relative humidity is 100 percent, we feel like it's 80 degrees (27 C) out.
http://science.howstuffworks.com/dictio ... ion651.htm

You should be comfortable & hopefully no need for straighteners today :lol:

Cheers Sav :)

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Mon 06 Sep 2010 16:52

http://www.blitzortung.org
If you are using the radar, then the strikes are colour coded.
I've also discovered that they change colour as time increases between strikes
So apologies for any earlier storm reporting confusion

White = 20 mins
Yellow = 20-40 mins
Light Orange = 40-60 mins
Dark Orange = 60-80 mins
Red = 80-100 mins
Dark Red = 100-120 mins

Cheers Sav :)
Last edited by Sav on Sun 19 Sep 2010 18:24, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Mon 25 Oct 2010 13:16

thumbelina wrote: The trees are GROANING under the weight of all of the fruit, nuts and berries - old wives tales say that that is the sign of a long, hard winter!!
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-11380925

The leaves did seem reluctant to colour while we were in the PO :roll:

When leaves fall early,
Fall and Winter will be mild;
When leaves fall late,
Winter will be severe.

Squirrels gathering nuts in a flurry,
Will cause snow to gather in a hurry.
Keep your eyes peeled ;)
http://www.stormfax.com/wxlore.htm

Cheers Sav :)

thumbelina
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 811
Joined: Wed 22 Oct 2008 22:00
Contact:

Post by thumbelina » Tue 02 Nov 2010 12:35


User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Mon 08 Nov 2010 16:12

thumbelina wrote:To be fair, Sue, it's been cold all day up here; the temp hasn't risen above 8° (north facing wall in the shade, obviously! :wink: )
Quote: If the garden is not suitable, or you have no garden, then consideration may be given to mounting a screen on a north facing wall. There is a problem in this case with possible contamination from heat energy emitted by the building itself. A practical compromise would be to use such a wall, but carry the screen/shield away from the wall on a bracket - this would allow a free airflow around the equipment. A distance of 20-25 cm for an unshielded sensor has been suggested, and this would certainly minimise any contamination from the walls. For a shielded (or screened) sensor, then 10 cm or so has been suggested as a useful distance. Even a north wall mounting needs watching around the summer solstice, particularly at more northern latitudes, as care needs to be taken to shield the thermometers/sensors from early morning and late evening sunshine with an unobstructed horizon to the northeast or northwest.
http://weatherfaqs.org.uk/node/124
I'm not a perfectionist :lol:

Cheers Sav :)

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Tue 09 Nov 2010 14:56

Hi all :)

Forecasts

We are fortunate that Meteociel gives us a facility, where we can peruse the weather for a certain city/town in France.
Here in the UK we are reliant on the model output on each run ( as there is no local guide )
So we then have to analyse the data, to come up with what the weather might be doing.
http://www.wetterzentrale.de/
This forecast would comprise of a general overview
Example
http://www.meteociel.fr/modeles/gfs/pre ... ons/3h.htm
But the UK would not be broken into sections

Now no forecast is perfect, so the output you see on your own locale, does not mean the weather is going to entirely conform.
At the bottom of the page, Meteociel tells us that the information is taken from the raw data of the GFS & that forecasts are only an indication, this also includes estimations of temp & wind, which can be misleading.

Now as far as my own interpretation of the forecast is concerned
Bearing in mind the 18Z does not roll out until later in the evening
I have to convey to you in the best way possible, what the weather may bring the following day.
On a difficult day, where the PO has received the kitchen sink of weather.
Its not easy to break it all down, for the short output on AD.
Example: Mainly cloudy means more cloud, but don't rule out a clear interval.
Also as has been pointed out, the close proximity of the mountains, which can make a big difference on the weather, as we have seen from pictures & reports from local people.

So what do we take from all my rambling :lol:
That i am gratefull we have this outlet via Meteociel & even if it just gives us a guide for the following day, then that can only be a good thing. ;)

Cheers Sav :)

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Thu 16 Dec 2010 19:05

john wrote:Well,have spent the morning down on the coast again (St Cyp and P Vendres) and again it was much calmer down there than here,thus once more exploding the "the tram is always stronger on the coast than the hills" old wives' tale.
We would have to conduct an experiment, to see a better conclusion to the wind debate ( no i'm not talking beans ) :lol:
Yes it is windier in exposed parts & on the coast
That's only going by my experience of watching the models & spending time in the PO
Drive from Ceret to Argeles ( wind increases ) & then back again during the Tramontane ( wind decreases ) & the same usually applies to the temps.

Quote: The aspect of the weather that tends to affect the lifestyle of coastal dwellers the most is the wind.
http://www.coastalgardens.com/book2.html

Some more info
Quote: The Tramontane is a violent, cold wind, characteristically and markedly turbulent, which blows from between W and NW, descending the foothills of the Pyrenees (into Spain) and the hills of the southern Massif Central and travelling through the Gateway of Naurouze (Lauragais) between the Côte de la Malepere and Razès and the Montagne Noir, before sweeping the coastal plains of lower Languedoc and Roussillon. [readers will note the similarity with the description of the Cers]
This regional/local wind presents a number of analogies with the cold Mistral:
1. it blows in all seasons, but with more vigour in winter and spring
2. it blows in gusts
3. it is often very strong and agricultural activities, homes and routeways need protection from it.
4. it accelerates as it passes through narrow, deep corridors of land
http://www.qondio.com/local-winds-in-sw-france

It could quite easily fit with the funneling effect from Arles sur Tech & then gradually opening out to reach the coast ( Port Vendres/Cap Bear etc ) where the winds are the strongest.
I have reported during windy episodes & the strongest winds are allways centered by the sea.
The Tram is a gusty wind, so its probable there will be lulls during its progress & you could be in a sheltered area.
Anyway hopefully the above article will help regards wind & may your clothing remain atached to your pegs ;)

Cheers Sav :)
Last edited by Sav on Thu 16 Dec 2010 19:19, edited 1 time in total.
Image

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Thu 16 Dec 2010 19:13

john wrote: I never cease to be impressed by just how accurate Meteociel is. They promised this FW would abate after 16h00,and here it is, 16h35,and ,yes,it really has noticeably lessened in the last 45mins !

Meteociel stands out from the crowd, because it allows us to see an experimental breakdown of the model for most French cities & towns.
If we were to use the model itself, then it would be a SE France forecast, similar to what you get on the local TV Meteo, which i must say is pants :roll:


No wonder Savo wins all these awards if he uses them as his source.
:lol:

Cheers Sav :)
Image

Serge

Post by Serge » Thu 16 Dec 2010 20:38

Sav wrote:4. it accelerates as it passes through narrow, deep corridors of land
It's the venturi effect Sav ........................ I could go on but I fear it would be wasted! :wink:

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Thu 16 Dec 2010 20:47

john wrote: You are quite right that often the wind is stronger by the coast,but,by no means always.

The strongest winds I've ever experienced on the coast are,perhaps unsurprisingly, when the wind's been coming in off the sea.
There are allways variables, elevation will also impact on wind speed.
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/w ... a00160.htm

Plus if you go higher, there's assistance to get you back to Anglaterre quickly ;)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jet_stream

Cheers Sav :)
Image

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Fri 17 Dec 2010 20:54

john wrote: Thanks for explaining all that Sav. Taught me a lot of stuff I never knew.
Glad it helped :wink:

So,in a nutshell,the height,position of the place (eg aspect of the valley),and direction of the wind, relevant to it ,is at least as important to the wind's strength as it's basic pressure led speed?

Which would go a long way to explaining why the wind was stiffer than normal up at Thumbers'gaff (and mine) than it was on the coast yesterday.

Being in the Pyrenees & you & thumbers are in the mountain height's, weather can change very dramatically & in a very short time.
If the forecast is dry, it could be raining higher up the mountain.
The same would apply to the wind etc & dependant if you have a wind break around your property, which would deflect the worst effects.
Mountains = Variable
If your walking especially, it might be fine on the plain, but could be very different up above.


On a similar note,why do the media make such a big thing about wind speeds/gusts at places like Cap Bear,Cap Creus,and (in UK) Cape Wrath? To me it seems obvious that winds would be stronger on exposed headlands like that. But fairly irrelevant. What people REALLY want to know is the wind strength in populated areas. For example I'd be far more interested in the wind,and its potential for damage in Perpignan,Céret, or St Cyprien.
Quote: Once the forecast is written, it is sent out to the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, so all the coastguard stations in the UK receive a copy of the forecast. It is also sent to the BBC as well as going on the Met Office website.

Anton stresses that the main aim of the forecast is the safety of lives at sea: "The forecaster will always try and be as accurate as possible," he said.

"But if there is a large range of winds, say from Force 2 up to Force 7, the forecaster will always concentrate on the stronger winds as they have the greatest implications for the safety of people.

"Sometimes that can be at the expense of the lighter winds that don't get a mention."
http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/devon/hi/pe ... 961585.stm

So taking into account that Port Vendres is a main shipping harbour, then the focus will fall on them more with regards to ships/boats entering & leaving the docks.
I'm wondering if there's a french shipping forecast
:roll:

Cheers Sav :)
Image

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Tue 18 Jan 2011 16:23

john wrote: Nothing that a couple of weeks' good spring downpours (preferably overnight...) will not solve.

Ever since I've been involved with this area,this has always been a dry time of the year,and,(Sav will correct me if I'm wrong on this) February is,statistically,the driest month in PO.
Hi john :)

Unfortunately the spring rains will not add greatly to the water table, so any snow during the winter is welcome.
I have got some stats for Perpignan going back 5 years, in relation to Feb precipitation.
2006 - Feb - 11mm
http://www.meteociel.fr/climatologie/vi ... annee=2006
2007 - Feb - 84mm
http://www.meteociel.fr/climatologie/vi ... annee=2007
2008 - Feb - 5.2mm
http://www.meteociel.fr/climatologie/vi ... annee=2008
2009 - Feb - 27.8mm
http://www.meteociel.fr/climatologie/vi ... annee=2009
2010 - Feb - 49.4mm
http://www.meteociel.fr/climatologie/vi ... annee=2010

Bearing in mind that the rainfall totals will be greater in those areas closer to the mountains
Winter is still young & perhaps we may be reflecting differently when the spring arrives

Cheers Sav :)
Image

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Tue 18 Jan 2011 18:24

john wrote: Trouble is ,Sav those are just the figures for Feb alone. We need to look at all the months over a longer period . I remember reading somewhere that on average Feb is the driest month here. Is that the case?
Hi john & all :)

Taking an average from 1974-2004
http://www.creme-de-languedoc.com/Langu ... istics.php
Feb does stand out as one of the dry month's, July leading the pack being as its a summer month.

Cheers Sav :)
Last edited by Sav on Mon 31 Jan 2011 23:51, edited 1 time in total.
Image

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Tue 18 Jan 2011 18:30

thumbelina wrote:Taking the statistics from January 2003 - December 2010, February is the third wettest month of the year. October, January and February are the three wettest. July, June and August are the three driest.
There is no denying that October was wet in 2010 with some 173.9 mm of rain. But 2010, as a whole, was the fourth driest year since 2003. Following on from 2007, 2009 and 2008.
Thank you for taking the stats to the present day thumbers
Just goes to show how our climate is allways changing ;)

Cheers Sav :)
Image

User avatar
Sav
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 588
Joined: Mon 18 Sep 2006 17:01
Contact:

Post by Sav » Thu 23 Jun 2011 15:10

Hi all :)

Weather is such a great subject & it's always changing ;)
Our planet has gone through many cycles & will no doubt go through many others as time goes by.
It has seen very warm periods & very cold ones, long before cars/aircraft etc.
If you believe some of the scientists, the earth stopped warming in 1998.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8299079.stm

Also sun spots are on the decline & could impact our future climate
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news ... e-science/

We have observed that there have been many events that have impacted the world in recent times, weather, earthquakes, volcanoes etc.
Is this just another one of those cycles that has happened before ?
Time will tell, but no matter what we do to assist the climate, at the end of the day Mother Nature will probably have the final say.

As far as rainfall in June is concerned, up until today not a great deal has been recorded in Perpignan since the beginning of the month.
http://www.meteociel.fr/climatologie/vi ... annee=2011
Those early days did deliver a lot of rainfall & the current total stands at 42.6mm
Records going back to 2002, show this month as having record rainfall in recent times.
Plus we are not at the end of the month yet
So yes record rainfall for Perpignan, but it would be good if we had another recording facility further inland, so we could compare results.
Time to get your rain gauges out :lol:
You could also try this
http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/sc2.html

Cheers Sav :)
Image

Post Reply