Content Portability Rules 1 April 2018

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neil mitchell
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Content Portability Rules 1 April 2018

Post by neil mitchell » Tue 03 Apr 2018 19:01

Apparently the EU have ruled that as of 1/4/18 citizens of member states must be able to receive paid for online content from providers in their own country in any EU country (without VPN/Smart DNS etc).

This apparently means the likes of Netfllx etc but Free to View Providers such as BBC, ITV etc are "being encouraged" to comply.

I notice that ITV have now discontinued their ITV Essentials saying that it is no longer necessary if you have the ITV Hub. so maybe they are complying.

BBC (which costs substantially more than any other paid for service) have decided not to allow it.

Makes you proud to be British dunnit.

Currently in UK so can't test it.

Allan
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Post by Allan » Tue 03 Apr 2018 21:28

Well, Sky Go works without a VPN, as does ITV hub.

I’ve just the regulations and they seem pretty sensible so will probably not survive Brexit.

Basically they say that if you live in an EU country and have paid to watch content in your main country of residence, then you can now watch that content whilst travelling in any other EU country.

They don’t cater for people buying content outside of their main country of residence so in theory won’t benefit those of us permanently living here.

I suspect however that the complexities of checking will probably mean that nobody will bother.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/legislati ... ne-content

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Post by neil mitchell » Wed 04 Apr 2018 08:59

Thanks Allan.
Seems as though it is actually happening. Surely the BBC would find it the least difficult to verify entitlement, I get that ITV would find it difficult which is probably why they folded early. And I guess you are right, for UK tv it is only good until Brexit.

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Post by Allan » Wed 04 Apr 2018 10:23

neil mitchell wrote:Thanks Allan.
Seems as though it is actually happening. Surely the BBC would find it the least difficult to verify entitlement, I get that ITV would find it difficult which is probably why they folded early. And I guess you are right, for UK tv it is only good until Brexit.
According to ITV’s website, it is only their paid for service that is available.

https://www.itvessentials.com/#dont-miss

But I definitely watched ITV, both on their hub and via Sky Go without a VPN and with a French IP address.

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Re: Content Portability Rules 1 April 2018

Post by martyn94 » Wed 04 Apr 2018 14:07

neil mitchell wrote:Apparently the EU have ruled that as of 1/4/18 citizens of member states must be able to receive paid for online content from providers in their own country in any EU country (without VPN/Smart DNS etc).

This apparently means the likes of Netfllx etc but Free to View Providers such as BBC, ITV etc are "being encouraged" to comply.

I notice that ITV have now discontinued their ITV Essentials saying that it is no longer necessary if you have the ITV Hub. so maybe they are complying.

BBC (which costs substantially more than any other paid for service) have decided not to allow it
How on earth do you work that out? The full English breakfast from Sky seems to cost about £50 a month, and those are just the initial “come-onâ€￾ rates.

I would have thought that effective verification is essentially impossible: I may not live in the UK, but I know lots of people who do, whether or not they want me to take their identity.

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Post by neil mitchell » Wed 04 Apr 2018 16:50

It refers to online content so I was comparing it to Netflix etc. Also it refers to content which has been paid for in ones country of residence so isn't really relevant to those who live in France full time.
Given that pretty much everyone who lives here part time but is still a UK resident will have a UK tv license with some kind of unique code on it the issue of validating must be pretty simple.

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Re: Content Portability Rules 1 April 2018

Post by Allan » Wed 04 Apr 2018 16:56

martyn94 wrote:
neil mitchell wrote:Apparently the EU have ruled that as of 1/4/18 citizens of member states must be able to receive paid for online content from providers in their own country in any EU country (without VPN/Smart DNS etc).

This apparently means the likes of Netfllx etc but Free to View Providers such as BBC, ITV etc are "being encouraged" to comply.

I notice that ITV have now discontinued their ITV Essentials saying that it is no longer necessary if you have the ITV Hub. so maybe they are complying.

BBC (which costs substantially more than any other paid for service) have decided not to allow it

How on earth do you work that out? The full English breakfast from Sky seems to cost about £50 a month, and those are just the initial “come-onâ€￾ rates.

I would have thought that effective verification is essentially impossible: I may not live in the UK, but I know lots of people who do, whether or not they want me to take their identity.
I presume Neil is referring to the licence fee which funds the BBC but the ruling explicitly excludes services like that.

By the way, you are a bit out of touch with Sky - the full package is £84

They are only allowed to verify in certain ways:-
Providers of online content must verify the subscriber’s Member State of residence by using no more than two – reasonable, proportionate and effective – means of verification in a list (including, inter alia, identity card, payment details, location of a decoder, internet or telephone service supply contract, internet protocol (IP) address).

The last one is a bit strange since overseas viewers will inevitably have an overseas iP address - at least while they are overseas.

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Post by neil mitchell » Wed 04 Apr 2018 18:29

Hi Allan.

Yes I was referring to the license fee but I was only using it as a comparison, The funding arrangements for the BBC are always unique, more like a tax really.

The BBC already make you login and confirm that you have a license before you can use IPlayer. At the moment that is just a self declaration backed up by prosecution if you actually don't have a license but it surely could only take moment at BBC HQ to link license details to login details.

I know that they din't want to do it but I'm sure that they could easily.

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