UK wines??

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Roger O
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UK wines??

Post by Roger O » Tue 27 May 2008 11:55


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john
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Post by john » Tue 27 May 2008 15:11

As with so much of this "climate change" hype,this report relies on VERY large doses of speculation and hypothesis.

I know we won't be around in the year mentioned,but let's believe it when we see it!

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Santiago
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Post by Santiago » Tue 27 May 2008 15:23

Sounds like a right load of nonsense. They have grown Pinot Noir in Burgundy for well over a thousand years through the Medeival heat wave and the Victorian cool period. How this guy feels that the temperature of the UK can vary by so much in 70 years that we'd be growing grapes on Snowdon is beyond me.

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Post by Chris » Tue 27 May 2008 21:57

I walk up Snowdon most weeks; typically, it is very windy. Sometimes, I find it impossible to stand up ( I weigh 15 stone.) I remember one day last February when the wind defeated me; I was approaching the summit, even lying down on my belly on the snow, with two piolets and crampons on, I could not prevail against the wind, and had to give up and go down. The idea of planting vines there is ridiculous; they would not last more than a few days then they would be uprooted by the wind and blown away.
I am not convinced that global warming is happening anyway; if it is I suspect that it is a natural phenomenum over which we have no control.
We already grow excellent wine in Wales anyway, at the Ty Croes vineyard on Anglesey, about 8 miles as the crow flies from Snowdon. I hate to say it, but the white wine from there is as good as any I have ever tasted in France.

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Roger O
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Post by Roger O » Tue 27 May 2008 22:30

Well, there you are, then!
http://www.tycroesvineyard.co.uk/

Oh well, not to be outdone on this subject
as a Devon man (some traces still left)
I have to put this one up!
http://www.yearlstone.co.uk/wines/
http://www.discoverdevon.com/site/thing ... rd-p238193

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Santiago
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Post by Santiago » Tue 27 May 2008 23:44

We already grow excellent wine in Wales anyway, at the Ty Croes vineyard on Anglesey, about 8 miles as the crow flies from Snowdon. I hate to say it, but the white wine from there is as good as any I have ever tasted in France.
You definitely need to do more exploration of French wine then. :wink:

(Remember. I've made the Ty Croes wine.)

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Post by Chris » Wed 28 May 2008 09:28

erm, (hasty insertion of caveat imminent) - except d'Yquem, Vouvray, Banyuls - and yours!! :)

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Santiago
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Post by Santiago » Wed 28 May 2008 09:46

:D :D


Have a look at the article I wrote on French wines for more examples.

http://www.anglophone-direct.com/Guide-to-French-Wine

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Post by john » Wed 28 May 2008 12:13

Presumably if this place is in Anglesey,it must be the most Northerly (or near as dammit) vineyard in the world. All the American/Canadian/Russian ones will be a good deal further south.

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Post by Arthur and Lyn » Wed 28 May 2008 16:11

Actually John,
I am sure there are some vineyards in Yorkshire. I used to have a book, bought at the Three Choirs Vineyard, near Gloucester called Vineyards of Britain ( I disposed of it when we moved here), thats where I read about them, also some in Derbyshire. I can't vouch for the quality but there you go.
Arthur

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Post by opas » Wed 28 May 2008 17:25

RSS| Britain's No.1 quality newspaper website | Make us your homepageWednesday 28 May 2008


Our trends in the north
Last Updated: 12:01am BST 08/07/2006




Grape expectations
Wines of the week




Sarah Todd meets the former chemistry teacher whose Yorkshire vineyard is graduating to the top of the class

Early one January morning, chemistry teacher George Bowden set out for an exam board meeting. With the snow coming down thick and fast, he steered his car down the motorway rather than risking the country roads he would normally have taken. Everywhere was white, but when he returned at around 3 o'clock that afternoon he noticed a little field where all the snow had melted. A few years later, in 1985, he walked into an auction held in a pub and bought that same field.


George Bowden surveys his vineyard

"It struck me as interesting that it was so obviously south-facing and catching the sun," Bowden recalls. "The fact that the melting snow was so quickly draining away also got me thinking." This information was stored in the back of his mind and Bowden carried on teaching his secondary-school pupils. He laughs at how his style would be frowned upon now.

"I used to make wine with the children," he confides. "I'd probably get the sack for doing that in today's classrooms. But it was a great way of getting them to look at chemistry as more than just another lesson."

Bowden's six-acre field sits within the Leeds city boundaries, within sight of the M1 and M62 motorways, and is now the most northerly commercial vineyard in Britain. He had no specific plan as he walked into the pub for the auction. He merely hoped that the local farmers had already spent their money and wouldn't be bidding, as the field was the last piece of a large acreage to come up for sale. In addition, its size and slope meant it wasn't the easiest field on which to manoeuvre a combine harvester.

Since then he has progressed in leaps and bounds. Chef Rick Stein recommends the Leventhorpe Vineyard in his guide to the food heroes of Britain, while Oz Clarke, the wine writer and television presenter, declared Bowden's Seyval 2001 the best of the bunch in a televised blind tasting. Clarke was given a selection of wines priced from £3 to £15, from wine-growing regions around the world, and chose the northern number, which normally retails at around £6 a bottle, as the best.

advertisementIt is the Leventhorpe Sparkling that has perhaps caught the imagination most. Bowden, who retired in 1999, after almost 25 years at the chalkface, brings the sparkling winemaking process to life with the passion of one of those once-in-a-lifetime teachers. He even makes the vibrations of the refrigerator - and their potentially detrimental effect on the bubbles - sound interesting.

With its unusual micro-climate, Leventhorpe Vineyard can best be described as similar to the Loire valley. It has set something of a trend, with three other Yorkshire vineyards now in existence. The last vine has only recently been planted at Yorkshire's fourth (and newest) vineyard. The first harvest at Ryedale Vineyards, near Malton in North Yorkshire, won't be ready until 2008.

Owners Stuart and Elizabeth Smith believe wine will follow a similar path to food: "People are so concerned about sourcing their food locally that there's no reason why there shouldn't be a knock-on effect with wine." Many believe the rich soil gives extra body and character to northern wines.

Bowden's wine has won too many medals to be a novelty, and he mastered the art long before global warming came into the equation. "I've always believed that there's no point moaning about the weather," he says, adding with irony: "Climate change won't make it any easier, just less difficult.

"If an Australian went to Burgundy - without knowing anything about its wine-making history - and looked at the climate and the terrain, he would say 'No way mate, you're wasting your time'." Instead Bowden works with the weather rather than trying to beat it, and concentrates on the quality rather than the quantity of grapes.

Leventhorpe is very much a one-man band. His wife, Janet Bowden, a civil servant, helps when she can and is in charge of all the finances, but all the other jobs - bottling, labelling, pruning - are done by the man himself.

All apart from grape picking, of course. An image of young students soon falls on stony ground. "We don't start harvesting until the end of October so they're back in lectures by then," says Bowden, who was bitten by the wine bug while working in California in the 1960s. "I have a small number of mainly retired gentlemen who come and seem to enjoy the exercise. We have a very pleasant time, with numerous tea breaks. In fact, two of the helpers are teetotal Methodists."

Leventhorpe Vineyard, Bullerthorpe Lane, Woodlesford, Leeds (0113 288 9088). George Bowden occasionally joins students from Plumpton College, Sussex, which runs wine studies courses (01273 890454; visit www.plumpton.ac.uk).
For more information on English wine, see www.englishwineproducers.com.

Grape expectations

Wine cultivation in the north is nothing new. The Romans made wine (although the climate was much more predictable then), as did the Cistercian and Benedictine monks.

Vineyards declined in the 12th century when Henry II married Eleanor of Aquitaine, inheriting the wine-growing area of Bordeaux. Vast quantities of cheap claret flowed into England.

The only time that no large vineyards existed in Britain was between the two world wars, when vineyards were grubbed up to grow other crops to help the war effort. Ironically, the Second World War encouraged the revival of English wine. Many soldiers returned from service in Europe to experiment with small vineyards.

Wines of the week

1999 Nyetimber Première Cuvée, 12% vol, Sussex (£21.99; Waitrose and Berry Bros, 0870 900 4300). Lost the footie, won the wine competitions (and lots of them). Nyetimber has single-handedly made English wine respectable. Golden colour, buttery brioche aromas, roasted nut and pineapple flavours, awesome body and length — this is world-class wine.

2003 Chapel Down Pinot Noir, 11% vol, Kent (£12.99; Chapel Down Winery, 01580 763033 for suppliers). The “Best Red Wine” at the English Wine Awards last month, this could proudly hold its own against “village” level Burgundy. Super-toasty oak, with lots of cherries and a suggestion of Earl Grey.

2004 Leventhorpe Madeleine Angevine, 11.5% vol, Yorkshire (£7.00; Leventhorpe Vineyard, 0113 288 9088). A lovely, romantic-sounding name for a grape and the wine isn’t half bad either. Fragrant with Viognier-like apricots (and something slightly smoky), it’s beautifully balanced and sensibly priced. Heavenly with salmon in a creamy fennel sauce.

2004 Three Choirs Estate Premium Selection, 10.5% vol, Gloucestershire (£5.99; Tanners Wines, 01743 234455). A mix of Seyval Blanc, Reichensteiner and Müller- Thurgau from one of the larger producers. Aromatic, and with crackling acidity to keep the toothsome fruit in balance, this is a fl inty, slightly minty and distinctively English wine.








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john
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Post by john » Wed 28 May 2008 17:32

Blimey,North Yorks would certainly beat Anglesey in the "northerliness" stakes. Wine from Yorks..whatever next?

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Post by opas » Wed 28 May 2008 18:02

Black pud in the south of france............. :lol: :lol:

jerry

Post by jerry » Mon 11 Aug 2008 06:51

Hi this is jerry

Uk wine are world famous wine i drunk UK wine so many times

there is a good opportunity to take that wine

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Post by carol sheridan » Mon 11 Aug 2008 07:20

opas wrote:Black pud in the south of france............. :lol: :lol:
Too late, Opas.............boudin

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Roger O
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Post by Roger O » Mon 11 Aug 2008 08:55

... course, there are alternatives for those hard types who prefer
"instant 90% kick"
Image

(In contrast to the local USAP, the above is known as ZAPU)

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Post by gameel » Thu 21 Aug 2008 08:26

Hi, I live in the UK too. Tesco sell lots of vegan wines, some are very expensive, but if you browse around you can find some in the region of about £20. Have a look round your local supermarket, there are wines that are much cheaper than £20.

Hope this helps! =)

[edit] @probablygraham- Not all wines are vegetarian.
These are the most common agents used during the fining process:
Gelatine - from bones and connective tissues of cows or pigs
Isinglass - obtained from fish swim bladders
Chitin - derived from the shells of crabs or lobsters
Casein - obtained from milk
Albumin - from egg whites
Bentonite - a type of clay
Ox Blood - banned in Europe due to BSE

Click here and Enjoyyyyyyyyyyyy

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Marguerite & Steve
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Post by Marguerite & Steve » Thu 21 Aug 2008 09:18

...they come out of the wood work.. :roll:

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Post by PaddyFrog » Thu 21 Aug 2008 09:38

No wonder Wine is good for you!!

You get the Anti Toxins from the Grapes!

Calcium from the Bones!

Omega 3 From the fish!

Iodine from the Crabs!

Image

What a Miracle Product, the more you use the better looking the people around you look!!!!!

Luvly

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Michael

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polremy
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british wine

Post by polremy » Thu 21 Aug 2008 09:47

Ah. That explains it.
I thought everyone looked particularly beautiful where I was last night.
Now I know why.

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Post by hartim » Thu 28 Aug 2008 07:02

Even the British don't drink wine from the UK, that is why they drink fortified wines from Portugal and Spain like Port, Sherry, Madiera.

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Post by Chris » Thu 28 Aug 2008 09:32

Even the British don't drink wine from the UK, that is why they drink fortified wines from Portugal and Spain like Port, Sherry, Madiera.
Actually we do, we have some lovely white wines made in the UK, Three Choirs, Lamberhurst, Ty Croes.. to name but a few. The Queen only serves English "champagne" at banquets, and very nice it is too. I'm told it's grown near Folkestone, in a soil and climate almost identical to that in Reims.

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polremy
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Post by polremy » Thu 28 Aug 2008 09:52

chris, how does one wangle an invitation to a queen's banquet?

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Colin L
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Post by Colin L » Thu 28 Aug 2008 09:54

By the time The Owl catches up with these "Wine Club" adverts from India ("I live in the UK" ho ho) there are several good humoured responses. If he deletes the spam, he has to delete the responses. Shall I tell him just to leave them on the basis that it all helps to lighten the day?

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Santiago
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Post by Santiago » Thu 28 Aug 2008 09:59

I think so. It's pretty harmless spam and the inane comments generate some quite funny replies.

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sue and paul
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Post by sue and paul » Thu 28 Aug 2008 10:07

ooh goodie. can I be the language errors monitor - well, till I find another little time-waster to prevent me actually doing anything useful :lol:

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Post by Kate » Thu 28 Aug 2008 10:26

The job is yours Sue
You are now officially responsible for all Indian wine Club posts :lol: :lol:

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Colin L
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Post by Colin L » Thu 28 Aug 2008 11:03

Wow! What an honour. Parsing and analysis by appointment to the Webmistress. 8)

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Roger O
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Re: english wines

Post by Roger O » Thu 28 Aug 2008 11:38

polremy wrote:chris, how does one wangle an invitation to a queen's banquet?
With a Purdey, finely engraved and excellently presented!
http://newmilton.brief8.com/magazine/co ... deyhistory
... and one of these to "carry"!
Image

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Post by sue and paul » Thu 28 Aug 2008 13:44

"...Wow! What an honour. Parsing and analysis by appointment to the Webmistress. Cool..."

droit haut ma rue :lol: :lol:

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