PO based cocktails

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TonyGoodman
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PO based cocktails

Post by TonyGoodman » Fri 26 Jan 2018 12:21

Summer is not far away which means aperos with our neighbours. The area has a range of VDN's and vermouth style elixirs such as Byrrh. I had in mind making up a few jugs of cocktails. Maybe a "dry" and a "sweet" style. Looking on the net the only suggestions seem to revolve around adding a slug of gin. Has anyone a receipe they would care to share?

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Post by martyn94 » Fri 26 Jan 2018 14:17

I read somewhere that Dubonnet is now made at the Byrrh works (they are both part of the Pernod/Ricard empire). So you might look at that, depending how purist you are feeling (and if you ever see it).

Both the Queen and the late Queen Mum apparently drink/drank it with gin, and I can sympathize. But “craftâ€￾ gin seems to be booming everywhere else, so maybe it’s reached the P O. For myself, I think I’d rather get malaria.

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Post by TonyGoodman » Fri 26 Jan 2018 14:34

I've seen dubonnet around and its OK but nothing special. I was thinking of doing something with brands such as Suze or any similar brands I see in the local cave.

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Post by martyn94 » Fri 26 Jan 2018 15:14

TonyGoodman wrote:I've seen dubonnet around and its OK but nothing special. I was thinking of doing something with brands such as Suze or any similar brands I see in the local cave.
Apparently, Suze was originally made in Switzerland, then for most of its life in the suburbs of Paris, and only quite recently came to rest chez Byrrh. I don’t know whether that disqualifies it for you, but there’s also the consideration that it tastes like medicine. Which I guess it originally was, like all these drinks. It would be like making a cocktail out of Sanatogen Tonic Wine, or Buckfast if you are a Scot.

I don’t like Dubonnet much either, but I have sentimental feelings for it from the days when every Paris metro station had the slogan “Dubo - Dubon - Dubonnetâ€￾ painted on the tunnel walls just as you entered the station.

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Post by Allan » Fri 26 Jan 2018 18:24

It is fair to say that Byrrh and Suze are both pretty disgusting, there is an apricot liqueur from the region that might be a better bet. Try http://www.giffard.com/en/produits/abri ... ssillon-3/

You could also make a passable Bellini from Jolly Ferriol Pet Nat and the juice from local peaches.

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Post by TonyGoodman » Fri 26 Jan 2018 20:59

I like the idea of using local fruit, though I want to avoid creating Sangria. I had jn mind introducing a bit of a cool London vibe without using Gordon's gin. Are there any local vodka or brandy type creations?

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Post by Allan » Sat 27 Jan 2018 04:15

In France, all the grape skins have to go off to a distillery where they are made into industrial alcohol or a form of grappa known as Marc. Often Marcs are named after the region such as Marc de Champagne but you can also get Marc de Muscat.

I don’t know if there is such a distillery in the PO but there is certainly one in the minervois http://distillerie-petit-grain.fr/disti ... rcs-grappa

Some of their products originate in PO and they also make Gin in conjunction with Christopher Comes the chef at La Galinette in Perpignan.

I am sure that Santiago will know if there is a more local distillery.

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Post by Anthea & Tim » Sat 27 Jan 2018 10:44


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Post by martyn94 » Sat 27 Jan 2018 11:16

My experience of marc (and grappa) is that it is either too bad to drink under any circumstances, or too good (and expensive) to make a cocktail. Either way you get a vile hangover.

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Post by Santiago » Sun 28 Jan 2018 11:00

I'm not a fan of grappa or marc but you can buy it from the distillerie at Saint Felieu d'Avall. On the main road from le Soler.

You should go to Caves Byrrh and chat to the people there about cocktails made from their range of liqueur wines. The tourist office in Thuir has 2 shops which sell their products.

We created a "Muscatini" recipe a few years back made from Muscat de Rivesaltes, Tonic, orange juice and a touch of grated ginger.

I've also heard people who I trust mention Rivesaltes Ambré and Tonic. Though yet to try it.
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Post by martyn94 » Mon 29 Jan 2018 16:06

Santiago wrote:I'm not a fan of grappa or marc but you can buy it from the distillerie at Saint Felieu d'Avall. On the main road from le Soler.

You should go to Caves Byrrh and chat to the people there about cocktails made from their range of liqueur wines. The tourist office in Thuir has 2 shops which sell their products.

We created a "Muscatini" recipe a few years back made from Muscat de Rivesaltes, Tonic, orange juice and a touch of grated ginger.

I've also heard people who I trust mention Rivesaltes Ambré and Tonic. Though yet to try it.
Anything which starts from “liqueur wineâ€￾ (dread name! Unless it then says “plus ten parts of overproof ginâ€￾) is not my idea of a cocktail (though might keep your guests upright for longer). And your Rivesaltes and Tonic seems like a sort of overthought spritz, but probably not much the worse for that.

It’s interesting, if you Google, that “liqueur winesâ€￾ were often originally much stronger in alcohol, and I suspect much more medicinal - certainly so far as their quinine content goes, which is now restricted to pretty homeopathic levels. Mostly, then, I suspect, for babies with teething problems, and drunk by the mother.

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Post by TonyGoodman » Wed 31 Jan 2018 09:53

I think I'll go with a sweet martini made with a pale VDN and something like Sipsmiths gin garnished with a lemon peel or maybe freeze up a local lemon flavoured mineral water. A PO and UK fusion.

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Post by martyn94 » Wed 31 Jan 2018 16:56

http
TonyGoodman wrote:I think I'll go with a sweet martini made with a pale VDN and something like Sipsmiths gin garnished with a lemon peel or maybe freeze up a local lemon flavoured mineral water. A PO and UK fusion.
Martini seems to be about the only thing in that line that you can’t get from Byrrh. But you can get Cinzano, if this is still current

http://jeantosti.com/histoire/byrrh.htm

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Post by TonyGoodman » Thu 01 Feb 2018 10:39

I've been very impressed with some of the VDN's I've been asked to review. They are new to me and while some are a little too sweet for some anglo saxon palettes including mine some of the paler VDN's have an intriguing green/coriander taste while some of the ambers have a chocolate/coffee taste both of which I find quite attractive. Using one of those as a base should work with the botanicals in one of the new breed of gins. At the end of the day its all about offering something interesting to the neighbours. creating a talking point. If its dreadful so be it, I'll make sure I have a chilled bottle of something on standby.

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Post by Santiago » Thu 01 Feb 2018 12:36

Here is the perfect event for you ...

https://www.facebook.com/events/1566096793444250/
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Post by martyn94 » Thu 01 Feb 2018 15:07

TonyGoodman wrote:I've been very impressed with some of the VDN's I've been asked to review. They are new to me and while some are a little too sweet for some anglo saxon palettes including mine some of the paler VDN's have an intriguing green/coriander taste while some of the ambers have a chocolate/coffee taste both of which I find quite attractive. Using one of those as a base should work with the botanicals in one of the new breed of gins. At the end of the day its all about offering something interesting to the neighbours. creating a talking point. If its dreadful so be it, I'll make sure I have a chilled bottle of something on standby.
I think some of my issues (if you can call them that) are essentially semantic (which is tiresome on my part): some of what you call cocktails seem like punch to me. And there are hazards in that. With beer, or wine, or hard liquor, or classic cocktails, you know roughly where you are, and when to stop (usually pretty quickly). With more creative mixtures, you have fewer bearings: what starts as a talking point can become a “face down in the oystersâ€￾ point. Gin is not a close substitute for chilled lemonade. But no doubt you’ve already been there too (as a host, I mean).

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Post by TonyGoodman » Fri 02 Feb 2018 08:33

Thank you, an excellent heads up, Not sure if I'll last until 2 AM however its worth a look.

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Post by TonyGoodman » Fri 02 Feb 2018 09:03

martyn94 wrote:
TonyGoodman wrote:I've been very impressed with some of the VDN's I've been asked to review. They are new to me and while some are a little too sweet for some anglo saxon palettes including mine some of the paler VDN's have an intriguing green/coriander taste while some of the ambers have a chocolate/coffee taste both of which I find quite attractive. Using one of those as a base should work with the botanicals in one of the new breed of gins. At the end of the day its all about offering something interesting to the neighbours. creating a talking point. If its dreadful so be it, I'll make sure I have a chilled bottle of something on standby.
I think some of my issues (if you can call them that) are essentially semantic (which is tiresome on my part): some of what you call cocktails seem like punch to me. And there are hazards in that. With beer, or wine, or hard liquor, or classic cocktails, you know roughly where you are, and when to stop (usually pretty quickly). With more creative mixtures, you have fewer bearings: what starts as a talking point can become a “face down in the oystersâ€￾ point. Gin is not a close substitute for chilled lemonade. But no doubt you’ve already been there too (as a host, I mean).
Goodness gracious is there a guilty tale to tell behind that post? Adolescent high jinks perhaps at a church social evening? Vodka and tinned fruit salad in equal quantities? I hope at least the oysters were shucked and au natural of course, no Worcestershire. However as traumatic as it was, assuming it was not last week a chilled lemonade only policy ever since seems a bit draconian.


As with all things moderation is the key. Cocktails should always be served in modest quantities, no pint mugs. The idea being the creation of social bonds with the neighbours, to demonstrate some anglo saxons at least have ceased to eat with our feet despite what they read in the Daily Mail.

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Post by martyn94 » Fri 02 Feb 2018 14:58

One guilty tale and one innocent one. At about aged 18 I made a killer punch for a party (it nearly killed me, and I knew what was in it) on a solid basis of analytical (aka absolute) ethanol: 96% pure and upwards, and nothing else but water. I was working in a chemistry lab at the time.

About 10 years later, I helped organise my trade union branch’s Xmas party. I got the wine, and borrowed the glasses, from Oddbins. They were early onto the trend for glasses the size of a bird bath. Senior civil servants are quite temperate, on average, and more so their partners. But their intended “just a couple of glassesâ€￾ was about three times more than they intended. I had to grab a taxi to get relief supplies, and the scenes of carnage later on went well beyond the usual suspects. I invested in our own supply of paris goblets the following year (from Denny’s in Soho, from memory, before it was trendified).

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Post by TonyGoodman » Sun 04 Feb 2018 21:17

The chemistry dept always had the best parties at university.

We must catch up sometime, perhaps at the P/V market when the weather warms. Maybe see who else is in the area and have a closer look at the local seafood.

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