Oyster season wines

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TonyGoodman
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Oyster season wines

Post by TonyGoodman » Sat 06 Jan 2018 11:03

We have consumed gallons of Oyster Bay, it became our go to oyster specific wine almost from the first batch. While here just about any non-bottom shelf Pays Nantes Muscadet was our automatic selection. However these are no longer an option. Our personal test is whether the second or even third glass is as good as the first and we’ve found some great replacement wines which pass the test including a La Perdrix white, some cheerful Muscat Sec’s from around Alberes and our latest find an IGP Marsanne (Mas Molins – Vinca)) my BH picked up from the cave in the smaller covered market in Perpignan. Not being that French proficient she walked into the cave with a bag of 2 dozens oysters from the Poissionere, showed the caviste who immediately put two bottles in the bag. That’s what I call service.

Any suggestions?

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Post by martyn94 » Mon 15 Jan 2018 18:00

The person I normally eat with doesn’t like oysters. So I tend to eat them “sur le pouceâ€￾ as a second breakfast. Either in the market in Port-Vendres on Saturday morning, or in the café just next door. Or in the market in Collioure on a Sunday. In any case, I drink the wine which comes with them. Usually, I think, Picpoul de Pinet. It works for me, but it’s an occasion to be greedy rather than a gourmet.

I acknowledge that they are just a snack for me rather than fine dining. But how many oysters do you have to eat under any circumstances to get through three glasses of wine? Unless they are those huge ones where you need a knife and fork.

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Post by TonyGoodman » Tue 16 Jan 2018 11:12

We are very keen oyster consumers. My dear old dad had an oyster farm when we were youngsters, tucking into 2 or 3 dozen fresh from the rack was quite normal so I suppose I've carried that with me. These days we can quite happily share a bottle of wine and 2 dozens oysters over an appropriate period of time hence the comment about three standard glasses and the desire to find a light weight wine.

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Post by martyn94 » Tue 16 Jan 2018 18:56

TonyGoodman wrote:We are very keen oyster consumers. My dear old dad had an oyster farm when we were youngsters, tucking into 2 or 3 dozen fresh from the rack was quite normal so I suppose I've carried that with me. These days we can quite happily share a bottle of wine and 2 dozens oysters over an appropriate period of time hence the comment about three standard glasses and the desire to find a light weight wine.
As I said, Picpoul de Pinet. I haven’t bought it by the bottle for a while, so I have no particular brand to recommend. It’s pretty local, and even more local to our local oysters, not that necessarily proves anything much.

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Post by Webdoc » Tue 16 Jan 2018 19:39

http://www.cave-ormarine.com/fr/vins/ao ... arte-noire

This is our favourite.

The Ormarine brand (a co-op of 3 co-ops around Pinet) are trying to expand into sulphur-free picpoul. I tried some the other day. A different flavour altogether (? more authentic) and a yellow tinge. Not unpleasant but I fear we prefer the industrial variety.

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Post by TonyGoodman » Tue 16 Jan 2018 21:47

Thanks all. Anything sourced in the PO? I'll certainly look out for PP de P however I'm deliberately restricting the project to the PO.

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Post by Santiago » Wed 17 Jan 2018 11:53

The most neutral white grape in the PO is probably Macabeu but it can be oaked, oxidative and made very floral using designer yeasts.

I’ve tried lots of different white wines with oysters. Neutral and crisp seems best. Muscat sec is nice with richer seafood, like prawns, with aioli but clashes with oysters.

Then again it depends on the sauce you put on the oysters. I like Worcester sauce or the Vietnamese dipping sauce for Nems.
Domaine Treloar - Vineyard and Winery - www.domainetreloar.com - 04 68 95 02 29

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Post by Santiago » Wed 17 Jan 2018 12:01

I had a bottle of La Boulzane by J.L. Denois, bought from Caves Maillol last night. It certainly fits the bill for crisp and neutral. Worth a try with oysters.
Domaine Treloar - Vineyard and Winery - www.domainetreloar.com - 04 68 95 02 29

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Post by martyn94 » Wed 17 Jan 2018 13:50

TonyGoodman wrote:Thanks all. Anything sourced in the PO? I'll certainly look out for PP de P however I'm deliberately restricting the project to the PO.
Are there any oysters from the PO? I’m not being sarky: I just don’t know.

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Post by martyn94 » Wed 17 Jan 2018 14:06

Santiago wrote: Then again it depends on the sauce you put on the oysters. I like Worcester sauce or the Vietnamese dipping sauce for Nems.
What’s sauce? In the relatively tarty places (by my standards) where they give you mignonette as well as lemon, I can never resist trying it on a couple. I always regret it. Even more bizarre because I know I don’t like it after the first one, but I still put it on the second. A triumph of hope over experience, stretching over decades.

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Post by jethro » Wed 17 Jan 2018 21:00

While a fan of Picpoul de Pinet ( now inflated in price and reputation by the unfortunate plaudits of Jancis Robinson ) I also like a Chardonnay with fishy stuff and recent discoveries from the vineyard of Pierre Talayrach at Pezilla, Chardonnay Lumière de Pierre and Délice de Pierre, have given me a lot of pleasure. In his blog, he talks about being summoned to Paris to deliver his wine to the Elysée Palace, where the sommelier talked down his prices and bought 48 bottles on the spot. Check out his website. The wines are very democratically priced for such excellent products. I think there's also a Union Jack to click so you can read it in English. http://pierretalayrach.com/les-vins/
an' the wun' cried Mary.

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Post by TonyGoodman » Thu 18 Jan 2018 10:18

Good point re the origin of the oysters, while the regional border slices across the Lucate Etang so we can claim to be eating local produce its really is all about the wine. Some of the oysters from the Atlantic coast are magnificent.

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Post by TonyGoodman » Thu 18 Jan 2018 10:29

martyn94 wrote:
Santiago wrote: Then again it depends on the sauce you put on the oysters. I like Worcester sauce or the Vietnamese dipping sauce for Nems.
What’s sauce? In the relatively tarty places (by my standards) where they give you mignonette as well as lemon, I can never resist trying it on a couple. I always regret it. Even more bizarre because I know I don’t like it after the first one, but I still put it on the second. A triumph of hope over experience, stretching over decades.

We prefer fresh lemon if anything however I'm personally not adverse to a drop of green Tabasco, not sure if its available here but worth trying. If dining at home another tip is to give the oysters a few hours in salty water, using local salt of course. It allows them to vent built up waste, freshen up before for dinner and easier to open.

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Post by martyn94 » Fri 19 Jan 2018 15:55

TonyGoodman wrote:If dining at home another tip is to give the oysters a few hours in salty water, using local salt of course. It allows them to vent built up waste, freshen up before for dinner and easier to open.
Is this “detoxâ€￾ for your oysters, or “clean eatingâ€￾ for you? In any event, it must still be January.

More seriously, the “juiceâ€￾ varies between oysters depending where they come from. Notably as regards their salinity, but no doubt in other respects too if we were real connoisseurs. It’s a small part of the pleasure, and it seems a shame to homogenise them. If they have been properly raised, they do not need purging.

When I’ve been in New York (rarely now, when I have to pay for it all myself), I’ve tried to have lunch at the Oyster Bar in Grand Central Station. It’s very corny, and in all the guidebooks, but deservedly so. They have about twenty varieties on the go, from up and down the East and West coasts, and I can never remember which ones I have liked, or not, in the past. So I ask the waitress (as it usually is) for a mixed dozen. It’s remarkable how much they vary, for what are essentially the same animals or very closely related. There’s always one or two I like less, but that is part of the fun.

Fried clams and chips to follow. Warmly recommended.

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Post by TonyGoodman » Sat 20 Jan 2018 15:22

Its a detox thing, commonsense. As with any dinner guest with a long trip from home its good manners to give them a chance to freshen up before dinner. Let them sit in chilled slightly salty water for 20 mins or so before they come to the dinner table.

Shellfish while in transit continue to métabolise, waste builds up in the shell and they may have grit and other bits and bobs on board. My personal view is anything except say 2 or 3 hours travel time will affect the taste however I appreciate others feel its important to retain the original fluid. Each to their own i suppose. Its a similar discussion with prawns/crevettes/langoustines/lobsters. I like mine de-veined while others are happy to consume them as they come.

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Post by martyn94 » Tue 23 Jan 2018 22:30

TonyGoodman wrote:Its a detox thing, commonsense. As with any dinner guest with a long trip from home its good manners to give them a chance to freshen up before dinner. Let them sit in chilled slightly salty water for 20 mins or so before they come to the dinner table.

Shellfish while in transit continue to métabolise, waste builds up in the shell and they may have grit and other bits and bobs on board. My personal view is anything except say 2 or 3 hours travel time will affect the taste however I appreciate others feel its important to retain the original fluid. Each to their own i suppose. Its a similar discussion with prawns/crevettes/langoustines/lobsters. I like mine de-veined while others are happy to consume them as they come.
The trouble with “common senseâ€￾ is that it’s usually not common, and certainly not so in the case of oysters, and very often not sense either.

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Post by Perpipal » Fri 26 Jan 2018 22:49

... so it is not about the oysters, it is about being a wine snob. Michael Winner (Film Director) died from eating oysters - they are full of infection and mercury dumped in our seas. They are very chewy and taste like plasticine.

So what is the attraction when you have to sauce them up for some flavour?
Yes, they are full of zinc and most certainly don't boost your libido when you are lying in bed vomiting into a bucket. I prefer a bag of pistachios, lightly salted.

To continue on a positive note and if you wish to continue to eat this poison - local oysters are farmed in Leucate and are probably better washed down with a bottle of Entre-deux-Mers (Served ice cold). My old friend who used to live in Arcachon (Where the best oysters come from, apparentlly) used to eat about two dozen a day, he is now dead.
Bon Chance :roll:

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Post by TonyGoodman » Sun 28 Jan 2018 09:50

Goodness that's a very graphic and powerful picture, I haven't been so indisposed however I appreciate the need for care. I knew MW did indeed have a dose of something which could have come from poorly handled shellfish, he mentioned it and the symptoms quite often. However I did not know that's what did him in, I thought he passed away in his sleep after many years of excessive consumption of wine, women and song in equal proportions at the age of 77.

Modern oyster farms have all sorts of controls in place and if purchased from a reputable source are virtually guaranteed to be toxin free. Certainly there are parts of the world where they are grown in heavily polluted water, fattened up in untreated sewage however the local producers are fine. My suggestion regarding giving any shellfish a bath is all about reducing the built up natural waste products, removing grit and giving the wee beastie a chance to be at its best for dinner.

I agree re adding sauce, while its not really needed on prime oysters it's a fun thing. My condolences re your friend, was it a sudden illnes?

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Post by martyn94 » Tue 30 Jan 2018 15:50

TonyGoodman wrote:Goodness that's a very graphic and powerful picture, I haven't been so indisposed however I appreciate the need for care. I knew MW did indeed have a dose of something which could have come from poorly handled shellfish, he mentioned it and the symptoms quite often. However I did not know that's what did him in, I thought he passed away in his sleep after many years of excessive consumption of wine, women and song in equal proportions at the age of 77.

Modern oyster farms have all sorts of controls in place and if purchased from a reputable source are virtually guaranteed to be toxin free. Certainly there are parts of the world where they are grown in heavily polluted water, fattened up in untreated sewage however the local producers are fine. My suggestion regarding giving any shellfish a bath is all about reducing the built up natural waste products, removing grit and giving the wee beastie a chance to be at its best for dinner.

I agree re adding sauce, while its not really needed on prime oysters it's a fun thing. My condolences re your friend, was it a sudden illnes?
And don’t be blasé about pistachios. Apart from the usual risks of allergy (and at worst death from anaphylactic shock) common to tree nuts, there is also salmonella poisoning, and apparently much more. I almost had the energy to give you the links, but you can find them on Google. And don’t on any circumstances let your dog eat them.

My stepgrandmother lived latterly on Complan and whisky and soda (and Capstan Full Strength if that counts as food). Probably the perfect balanced diet if your teeth are dodgy. It worked very well for her.

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Post by TonyGoodman » Sun 04 Feb 2018 21:08

OK thanks for that, excellent advice no doubt.

Single malt scotch I assume? Highland or Speyside? Oban perhaps?

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