Overzealous Police

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Marguerite & Steve
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Overzealous Police

Post by Marguerite & Steve » Fri 01 Aug 2008 22:08

My brother in law is in Saumur, France, just travelled up from Lesquerde. He has been told that you MUST have your triangle and a yellow jacket for every person in the vehicle available in the back of the car and NOT in the boot, they are actively stopping people and asking you to get out the car, if you get out the car without your jacket on, they on the spot fine you.......Is that now the law in France?, as they are attacking british tourists. He noticed in our village (Lesquerde) that drivers had their yellow jackets on the passenger seats.....A CAUTION.

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polremy
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yellow jackets and triangles

Post by polremy » Fri 01 Aug 2008 22:36

We knew that the jackets had to be in the car. This makes sense if you break down at night on the motorway - you dont want to be fumbling about in the boot to get the jacket.
I didnt think the triangle had to be in the car - after all, you would have the jacket on when emerging from the car to get it and you would be visible.
The triangle needs assembling anyway, and it has to be positioned some way behind the car too.
So... jackets inside and triangle in the boot I think.
Been driving around here for over 20 years.
Actually the first time in 66 was the summer that Charles married Di - we had the "dont' do it, Di" badges I seem to remember.
In all that time neither of us have ever been stopped by police. We must look really innocent.
Shouldn't have said that I know.
Will probably get stopped tomorrow now!

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Marguerite & Steve
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Post by Marguerite & Steve » Fri 01 Aug 2008 22:44

My brother in law was told the triangle in the car and not the boot incase you have an accident and someone comes in the back of you, therefore you won't get in the boot.....sounds sensible to us the more we have thought about it.


.... I hope you don't get stopped. :?

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polremy
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triangle in boot

Post by polremy » Fri 01 Aug 2008 22:51

Ah, yes. I hadn't thought of that.
When OH gets back from his gig I'll get him to move it to inside the car.
Just had another thought too - the triangle will be underneath a complete drum kit when he is driving home.
Ah, well.

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Santiago
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Post by Santiago » Fri 01 Aug 2008 23:54

I'm thinking of the full implications of this.

Does it mean that if you are on a bus, there has to be a yellow jacket for each passenger?

If you offer someone a lift, do they need a yellow jacket.

If you have a hatchback, is it OK to put the stuff in the back?

Do the Simpsons need yellow jackets or can they just take their shirts off?

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polremy
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yellow jackes

Post by polremy » Sat 02 Aug 2008 00:04

It is my understanding that only one jacket is required per vehicle.
It might be different in Spain.

And, by the way, our jackets are orange.
I read somewhere recently that this is still OK.

When I do eventually get stopped I will find out I suppose!

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Post by blackduff » Sat 02 Aug 2008 00:06

Here's the Law.

http://www2.securiteroutiere.gouv.fr/vo ... 04-08.html

The gilet wearing to leave the voiture is required. The triangle has to be somewhere in the car. I didn't find any special place for the triangle-it just says it has to one a bord.

Blackduff

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Roger O
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Re: Overzealous Police

Post by Roger O » Sat 02 Aug 2008 00:20

Marguerite & Steve wrote:they are actively stopping people and asking you to get out the car, if you get out the car without your jacket on, they on the spot fine you........
You mean that at a police check point - when you have pulled off the road and exit the car - you are supposed to put on the gilet while exiting the vehicle??

I just can't believe that.. you are off road in the presence of the police and probably other witnesses and they would fine you for not putting on the gilet before or while exiting the car? That's not only ridiculous, but illegal - of that I'm sure! Do these police wear highly polished jackboots by any chance??

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Marguerite & Steve
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Post by Marguerite & Steve » Sat 02 Aug 2008 09:11

I too think it is ridiculous a jacket for everyone, that is why I asked the question. It could be someone scare mongering, we have 2 in our car but that is all, but want to make sure we are not breaking any laws, at the end of the day, it is also what is safe for you, we shall put our triangle under the seat in the back.

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Re: yellow jackes

Post by PaddyFrog » Sat 02 Aug 2008 11:15

polremy wrote: And, by the way, our jackets are orange.
I read somewhere recently that this is still OK.
It is if your are worker on BR/SNCF etc
Saturn Orange is used normally only on the Railways.

Maybe if you are changing a flat on a bougie.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Michael

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Tiffany
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The law says...

Post by Tiffany » Sat 02 Aug 2008 11:54

Reading the link provided above, the information on the Official site says that each DRIVER has to be equipped with a jacket. It doesn't say that the passengers have to be equipped with one. Also, it says that the driver has to wear it getting out of the car in the case of an emergency stop or in case of the car being immobilised at the side of the road. As already pointed out, the triangle just has to be 'on board'. Interestingly, though it says at the bottom that sanctions are only enforcable after the 1st October 2008, giving all drivers and fleet owners to equipe their vehicles. Thereafter, it will be finable offence of 135 euros or 90 euros if paid earlier.

It sounds to me as if the police are taking the p*** with the person's brother who was stopped.

Hope this helps.

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Tiffany
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On the spot fines

Post by Tiffany » Sat 02 Aug 2008 11:58

I would just like to add that as far as I'm aware there is no such thing as an 'on the spot fine' here in France- you get a notice.

If anyone is worried about being stopped, I would advise that you print out that page from the official website and carry it in the car, and challenge the police if you get stopped.

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Roger O
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Post by Roger O » Sat 02 Aug 2008 12:14

So, were they "really" police? Not the first time people pretending to be police have collected fines from tourists!!

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Chantal
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Post by Chantal » Sat 02 Aug 2008 16:46

".... Le gilet de sécurité, conforme à la réglementation en vigueur, devra être porté par le conducteur avant de sortir du véhicule, ..."

"... Le triangle de pré-signalisation devra se trouver à bord du véhicule. Le conducteur devra le placer sur la chaussée, dès qu'il sort du véhicule, à une distance de 30 mètres au moins ..."

Yep, as Tiffany says, there is only mention of the driver as regard the vest; not the passengers. and yes, the vest is to be worn before leaving the vehicle. Spain, we've been told requires two vests by law.

Re. the triangle, it is written'dès qu'il sort du véhicule'; not 'dès qu'il quitte son véhicule'. 'sortir' here means 'leaving the vehicle'. 'quitter' means the same, but to me, could be argued 'goes some distance away from his vehicle'. I therefore lean to the meaning - to have the triangle within the vehicle itself, not the boot.

Also, there is no mention of 'coffre' (boot) anywhere, but 'à bord du véhicule'; et non pas 'dans le véhicule'.

As for the '30 metres au moins' - I guess you all carry a French tape-measure in your vehicle, don't you?!! :lol:

Mind you, one consolation... this will apply to all of the EU countries - so, no escaping. I anticipate that eventually we will all have to wear the vest at all times, together will lights on at all times too (this latter already exists in France, but as a pilot-test at present - as I have been told). wow! what a glow! any global energy saving there...?

Well, the local gendarme, perhaps even town hall, might care to enlighten us. :roll:
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Tiffany
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overzealous police

Post by Tiffany » Sat 02 Aug 2008 17:25

But Chantal, you didn't finish the sentence:
'Le gilet de sécurité, conforme à la réglementation en vigueur, devra être porté par le conducteur avant de sortir du véhicule, lequel est immobilisé sur la chaussée ou ses abords à la suite d'un arrêt d'urgence.'

In relation to Marguerite and Steve's first post, her Brother in Law was told that they had to get out of the vehicle wearing the jacket: but their's wasn't an emergency stop or a breakdown, they were stopped by the police. Something definitely fishy about that stop.

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Chantal
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Post by Chantal » Sat 02 Aug 2008 18:11

Yes, Tiffany, I agree that it seems odd - the incident; just as mentioned by Roger O. too.

However, the thread seemed to have moved on to whether to wear the vest when coming out of the car, or whether it could be fetched from the boot first.

I wonder, was M&S's brother-in-law actually fined? Did he get a receipt of a kind? In addition, since this is not law until October 2008, I see no reason to pay/have to pay any fine. A 'caution' ought to be the word as it were.

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Marguerite & Steve
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Post by Marguerite & Steve » Sat 02 Aug 2008 20:19

No he wasn't fined, he was told by a local in Saumur, and was warning him, I wanted to make sure what " a neighbour" was telling him was true....seemed bizarre to us. My brother in law is a Police suprintendant in the UK, thats was strange about it all.

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Chantal
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overzealous police

Post by Chantal » Sat 02 Aug 2008 21:02

I guess there are some 'rotten apples' also in the French police.

A thought though - From what you say, I wonder if your brother-in-law ought not to report the incident. After all, either he will be confirmed that yes the law is ... and from October next, blah, blah; or, it may be that those phoney[?] policemen are already being sought and this event may not have been their first attempt?

If your brother-in-law does not/did not speak French , perhaps these 'guys' thought they'd try it on on easier targets?

my two-pence's worth.

chantal
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